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Category Archives: Pests and Disease

Gardens Have Pulled America Out of Some of Its Darkest Times. We Need Another Revival.

As the pandemic smolders and the economy plunges into an abyss, Americans have reverted to the venerable World War II–era tradition of organized disaster gardening. According to headline writers, that is. “Food Supply Anxiety Brings Back Victory Gardens,” declared the New York Times in late March. “Just like World War II, many are relying on their garden’s bounty to get them through this uncertain time,” echoed Good Housekeeping in early May. The multinational lawn-chemical giant Scotts Miracle-Gro wants to...
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It’s hot to be green: How urban gardening is taking over

The city and the countryside haven’t always seen eye to eye. In fact, the world’s greatest cities define themselves as everything rural areas can’t – vibrant, dynamic, bursting with energy and forward-thinking. But now, millions of urbanites are reconsidering. Greening the city has become an obsession for planners and apartment dwellers alike. But what does it mean for your life? Let’s take a look. How cities are launching a green revolution The last year or two have seen an acceleration...
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From floating islands to abandoned lots: urban gardening in Mexico

Urban gardening is nothing new in Mexico. Lack of space and a growing population led to the invention of chinampas, artificial islands in the lake waters of ancient Mexico City. Today, some of the islands still exist as productive farmland. The modern concept of reclaiming urban space for agriculture has become popular in Mexico for many of the same reasons as other parts of the world – concerns about the environment, food quality and food availability. It started in...
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Florida Weave: A Better Way to Trellis Tomatoes

The Florida Weave. I have to chuckle every time I hear the name. It sounds like a bad hairpiece, maybe even a rollickin’ good dance down south (and maybe it’s both?). But it’s actually an effective method of trellising (staking) tomatoes if you plant your tomatoes side by side in rows. Many small-scale farmers and commercial growers employ the Florida Weave method (also called the Basket Weave method) because it’s fast, simple to set up and maintain, and uses space...
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What is Diatomaceous Earth and How Can You Use It In The Garden?

Diatomaceous earth is a naturally occurring, soft sedimentary rock that is crumbled into a fine white powder. Wondering how you can use DE in your garden? Well, as a natural method of pest control! DE works at killing insects because the microscopic particles are very sharp and as an insect crawls over it, it gets cut. DE also can stick to the insect causing it to dry out. Diatomaceous Earth is completely NON-TOXIC! Because it harms insects physically, and not...
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How to Dry Oregano (and Other Herbs) Fast — Use the Oven!

Between my greenhouse and my garden, I have access to fresh herbs year-round and it really feels like a luxury (especially when they’re herbs I can’t easily find in just any market, like lemongrass or mitsuba). And while I usually use fresh herbs in my cooking, dried herbs are a convenience I can’t be without in the kitchen. If an herb can be dried, I probably have it stashed somewhere. I’ve even picked fresh bay leaves from my mother-in-law’s backyard...
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Having your own garden — and spending time in it — improves health and well-being, study suggests

If you’re fortunate enough to have your own yard or garden area, you may want to start spending more time in it. New research from the United Kingdom has found that having access to — and using — a personal patch of greenery is associated with better physical and psychological well-being. In fact, the increased health benefits from spending time gardening are similar to those seen among people who live in wealthy neighborhoods when compared with those who live in...
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Why and How to Transplant Tomatoes (a Second Time)

I’m at it again… transplanting tomatoes. The seeds were started indoors in newspaper pots. The healthiest seedlings were repotted into 4-inch pots once their true leaves appeared. Now, those seedlings (teenagers in tomato years) are being transplanted into 1-gallon containers. We’re more than a month into growing tomatoes, and while they can technically graduate to the garden by now, I prefer to transplant them into larger pots one more time. Related: Days to Maturity: What It Really Means for Your Plants What’s...
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How to make the most of any garden space

Spring is here and, after spending a great deal of time indoors over the past few months, it’s the perfect time to (safely) get outside, unplug from technology, and interact with the earth. And what better way to do this than by gardening? Whether you live in an apartment with limited outdoor access or have a spacious yard to work in, there are plenty of options that allow you to grow your own food and reap the mental...
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Urban Gardening: 10 Air-Purifying Plants To Keep Your Home Free Of Toxins

Since we’re all stuck at home trying to improve our health and immune system, it is important to keep the air in our homes clean. There are several ways to purify the air at home, but one option that is both natural and affordable is to use air-purifying plants to keep your house clear of the pollutants that we’re always exposed to. Whether it’s cleaning agents, pesticides, or lack of ventilation, all these are sources of indoor pollution that...
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Victory Gardens: Gardening for the homeland

The war gardens of WWI (1914-1918) and victory gardens of WWII (1941-1945) were government initiatives requesting civilians to become “soldiers of the soil” and grow their own fruits and vegetables. European and American farmers were enlisted in the military leaving a void in homeland food production labor. Also transport of food supply across the country or abroad was too costly. Growing one’s own food to support the war effort was deemed as a way to boost morale during...
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Best Edible Ground Covers for Vegetable Gardens

When we think of ground covers, we often think of things like alyssum, grasses, sedums, and other fast-spreading, low-growing plants that cover or creep along the earth. Essentially, they function as living mulches to reduce weeds and retain moisture by blocking sunlight. They’re usually grown in garden paths or along borders, and thought of as ornamental plantings to beautify and unite a landscape. But ground covers can also be grown in a vegetable garden — right inside the beds themselves...
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We are a Non-Profit Organization dedicated to increasing Property Ownership and Enterpreneurialism in Black and Underserved Communities.
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All the contributions are tax deductible. No goods or services will be provided to the donor in exchange for the contribution.
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